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HEATHROW TERMINAL 5: A FRESH APPROACH TO THE BALANCED SCORECARD January 8, 2010

Posted by Bima Hermastho in Balanced Scorecard.
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Heathrow Terminal 5 opened on 27 March 2008 with high expectations. It represents a major step in the transformation of Heathrow and it is now a major gateway to the UK.

From the start T5 was different and it needed to be due to its size, complexity and proximity. Despite some teething problems on opening, T5 was a catalyst for new and improved ways of working. One such initiative is the application of a Balanced Scorecard approach in managing quality in major projects.

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The T5 project

BAA’s Terminal 5 Programme at London Heathrow Airport was one of Europe’s largest construction projects. Terminal 5 caters for approximately 30 million passengers a year and provides additional terminal and aircraft packing capacity. There are 42 aircraft stands (in phase one) including stands to cater for the Airbus A380. T5 features a world-class transport interchange connecting road, rail and air transport. The Heathrow Express from London Paddington and the Piccadilly Line have been extended and a new spur road links T5 to the M25 motorway. Passengers move from the terminal to satellite buildings by a driver-less tracked transit system. The new 87-metre control tower will meet the longer term demands of air traffic control at Heathrow. The facility opened to the public on 27 March 2008 and represents a £4.3 billion investment to BAA.

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ALIGNING PERFORMACE EVALUATION AND REWARD SYSTEMS WITH CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY GOALS December 21, 2009

Posted by Bima Hermastho in Balanced Scorecard.
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This article discusses the problems that arise from having cost measurement, performance evaluation, and reward systems that are out of sync with organizational corporate sustainability reporting goals.

Increasing social and environ- mental awareness in companies has resulted in greater external reporting of their sustainability initiatives and outcomes. In 1998, thirty-five percent of the largest 250 companies of the Fortune Global 500 were producing environmental reports, and an additional thirty-two percent were producing environmental brochures or included such reporting in their annual reports.1 According to a recent KPMG 2008 survey, the percentage of these companies producing environmental reports in 2008 had increased to eighty percent.2 To support these efforts, much guidance (e.g., the Global Reporting Initiative framework) has been provided on the preparation of such reports.

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